[][src]Struct tokio::sync::Mutex

pub struct Mutex<T: ?Sized> { /* fields omitted */ }

An asynchronous Mutex-like type.

This type acts similarly to an asynchronous std::sync::Mutex, with one major difference: lock does not block and the lock guard can be held across await points.

Which kind of mutex should you use?

Contrary to popular belief, it is ok and often preferred to use the ordinary Mutex from the standard library in asynchronous code. This section will help you decide on which kind of mutex you should use.

The primary use case of the async mutex is to provide shared mutable access to IO resources such as a database connection. If the data stored behind the mutex is just data, it is often better to use a blocking mutex such as the one in the standard library or parking_lot. This is because the feature that the async mutex offers over the blocking mutex is that it is possible to keep the mutex locked across an .await point, which is rarely necessary for data.

A common pattern is to wrap the Arc<Mutex<...>> in a struct that provides non-async methods for performing operations on the data within, and only lock the mutex inside these methods. The mini-redis example provides an illustration of this pattern.

Additionally, when you do want shared access to an IO resource, it is often better to spawn a task to manage the IO resource, and to use message passing to communicate with that task.

Examples:

use tokio::sync::Mutex;
use std::sync::Arc;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() {
    let data1 = Arc::new(Mutex::new(0));
    let data2 = Arc::clone(&data1);

    tokio::spawn(async move {
        let mut lock = data2.lock().await;
        *lock += 1;
    });

    let mut lock = data1.lock().await;
    *lock += 1;
}
use tokio::sync::Mutex;
use std::sync::Arc;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() {
    let count = Arc::new(Mutex::new(0));

    for _ in 0..5 {
        let my_count = Arc::clone(&count);
        tokio::spawn(async move {
            for _ in 0..10 {
                let mut lock = my_count.lock().await;
                *lock += 1;
                println!("{}", lock);
            }
        });
    }

    loop {
        if *count.lock().await >= 50 {
            break;
        }
    }
    println!("Count hit 50.");
}

There are a few things of note here to pay attention to in this example.

  1. The mutex is wrapped in an Arc to allow it to be shared across threads.
  2. Each spawned task obtains a lock and releases it on every iteration.
  3. Mutation of the data protected by the Mutex is done by de-referencing the obtained lock as seen on lines 12 and 19.

Tokio's Mutex works in a simple FIFO (first in, first out) style where all calls to lock complete in the order they were performed. In that way the Mutex is "fair" and predictable in how it distributes the locks to inner data. This is why the output of the program above is an in-order count to 50. Locks are released and reacquired after every iteration, so basically, each thread goes to the back of the line after it increments the value once. Finally, since there is only a single valid lock at any given time, there is no possibility of a race condition when mutating the inner value.

Note that in contrast to std::sync::Mutex, this implementation does not poison the mutex when a thread holding the MutexGuard panics. In such a case, the mutex will be unlocked. If the panic is caught, this might leave the data protected by the mutex in an inconsistent state.

Implementations

impl<T: ?Sized> Mutex<T>[src]

pub fn new(t: T) -> Self where
    T: Sized
[src]

Creates a new lock in an unlocked state ready for use.

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;

let lock = Mutex::new(5);

pub async fn lock<'_, '_>(&'_ self) -> MutexGuard<'_, T>[src]

Locks this mutex, causing the current task to yield until the lock has been acquired. When the lock has been acquired, function returns a [MutexGuard].

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() {
    let mutex = Mutex::new(1);

    let mut n = mutex.lock().await;
    *n = 2;
}

pub async fn lock_owned(self: Arc<Self>) -> OwnedMutexGuard<T>[src]

Locks this mutex, causing the current task to yield until the lock has been acquired. When the lock has been acquired, this returns an [OwnedMutexGuard].

This method is identical to [Mutex::lock], except that the returned guard references the Mutex with an Arc rather than by borrowing it. Therefore, the Mutex must be wrapped in an Arc to call this method, and the guard will live for the 'static lifetime, as it keeps the Mutex alive by holding an Arc.

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;
use std::sync::Arc;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() {
    let mutex = Arc::new(Mutex::new(1));

    let mut n = mutex.clone().lock_owned().await;
    *n = 2;
}

pub fn try_lock(&self) -> Result<MutexGuard<T>, TryLockError>[src]

Attempts to acquire the lock, and returns TryLockError if the lock is currently held somewhere else.

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;

let mutex = Mutex::new(1);

let n = mutex.try_lock()?;
assert_eq!(*n, 1);

pub fn try_lock_owned(
    self: Arc<Self>
) -> Result<OwnedMutexGuard<T>, TryLockError>
[src]

Attempts to acquire the lock, and returns TryLockError if the lock is currently held somewhere else.

This method is identical to [Mutex::try_lock], except that the returned guard references the Mutex with an Arc rather than by borrowing it. Therefore, the Mutex must be wrapped in an Arc to call this method, and the guard will live for the 'static lifetime, as it keeps the Mutex alive by holding an Arc.

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;
use std::sync::Arc;

let mutex = Arc::new(Mutex::new(1));

let n = mutex.clone().try_lock_owned()?;
assert_eq!(*n, 1);

pub fn into_inner(self) -> T where
    T: Sized
[src]

Consumes the mutex, returning the underlying data.

Examples

use tokio::sync::Mutex;

#[tokio::main]
async fn main() {
    let mutex = Mutex::new(1);

    let n = mutex.into_inner();
    assert_eq!(n, 1);
}

Trait Implementations

impl<T: Debug + ?Sized> Debug for Mutex<T>[src]

impl<T> Default for Mutex<T> where
    T: Default
[src]

impl<T> From<T> for Mutex<T>[src]

impl<T: ?Sized> Send for Mutex<T> where
    T: Send
[src]

impl<T: ?Sized> Sync for Mutex<T> where
    T: Send
[src]

Auto Trait Implementations

impl<T> !RefUnwindSafe for Mutex<T>

impl<T: ?Sized> Unpin for Mutex<T> where
    T: Unpin

impl<T> !UnwindSafe for Mutex<T>

Blanket Implementations

impl<T> Any for T where
    T: 'static + ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> Borrow<T> for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> BorrowMut<T> for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> From<!> for T[src]

impl<T> From<T> for T[src]

impl<T, U> Into<U> for T where
    U: From<T>, 
[src]

impl<T, U> TryFrom<U> for T where
    U: Into<T>, 
[src]

type Error = Infallible

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl<T, U> TryInto<U> for T where
    U: TryFrom<T>, 
[src]

type Error = <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.